Tag Archives: mental-health

Adopted Reality, A Memoir by Laura Dennis

Today a review of Adopted Reality, A Memoir by Laura Dennis is on my writing blog, Healing by Writing.  An excerpt is below.

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Laura Dennis‘s Adopted Reality, A Memoir opens with riveting and tense words:

“I’ve successfully infiltrated the Illuminati’s West Coast cell.  I suspect they’re onto me.”

Although the reader senses in these words a psychological thriller, Adopted Reality is so much more.  Dennis writes with authenticity the raw truth of her many-sided life. Always searching fAdopted Realityor love as affirmation of her worth, she tells a story of personal perfectionism destroying happiness, how our flawed humanness is a natural part of each of us.  Unwittingly, through this drive for perfectionism, Dennis alienates friends and acquaintances leaving her feeling all alone.

The author effectively shares three life episodes in Adopted Reality:  her adoption, meeting her birth mother, and experiencing a bipolar episode after the events of September 11th.  Using flashbacks and smoothly crafted transitions in her writing, she pulls the reader into her story as if reading a novel and not a memoir.  This book is a page-turner not to be missed.

Read more here . . .

One Boy’s Struggle: A Memoir by Bryan L. Hutchinson

Today I am reviewing One Boy’s Struggle: A Memoir by Bryan L. Hutchinson on my writing blog, Healing by Writing.  I generally review memoirs on my writing blog because that is the genre I currently focus on in my writing.   However, from time to time, a memoir comes along that I feel warrants the attention of the general reading public.

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Bryan L. Hutchinson has written a book for all parents, teachers, physicians and counselors as well as any adult diagnosed with attention deficit disorder (“ADD”) to read.  Hutchinson spent his entire youth and young adult life wondering what made him different, unacceptable in some settings, and caused his difficult relationship with his father.

One Boy's Struggle

In One Boy’s Struggle: A MemoirHutchinson shares his highs and lows, ups and downs, succ

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s and failures, and how he finally came to understand himself and the world around him.

What this book is not:  

  • A manual of technical terminology explaining ADD in detail
  • A scientific explanation by a physician, psychologist, psychiatrist or other clinician
  • A medical textbook
  • An immediate fix for your loved one who suffers from ADD

To read more, click here.

The Invisible Storm by Juanima Hiatt

Today I am reviewing The Invisible Storm by Juanima Hiatt on my writing blog, Healing by Writing.  I generally review memoirs on my writing blog because that is the genre I currently focus on in my writing.   However, from time to time, a memoir comes along that I feel warrants the attention of the general reading public.

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With raw emotion, painful honesty, and a deep desire to help others, Juanima Hiatt has written her story of struggle with post-traumatic stress invisible stormdisorder (PTSD) in The Invisible Storm.

Likely we have all heard the acronym PTSD, and most often it has been with the stories of returning members of the military service branches who have been deployed to Iraq, Pakistan or Afghanistan in recent years.

Juanima’s story is not so different from those returning from war with PTSD, except that Juanima has never served in the military.  Her symptoms may be the same, her battle for recovery similar, and her frustration with the health care available to her often equal.  But Juanima is the mother of two young daughters and is married to the love of her life at the time of her diagnosis.  Why would she have PTSD?

Consider the word “traumatic” in the full description of the disorder.  Juanima was the victim of excessive trauma as a child and adolescent and even into young adult life.  Successful at finally reaching that place where she could push down everything that hurt her into a dark vacuous hole, Juanima managed to make her way through life, becoming a happily married woman and mother, until one fateful day.

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Read the rest of my review here.

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